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Full text of "Dedicated to progress ..."

4 






Uedicated to Progress . . . 



/ tht Portland ( ement /Kssociation t an address by President Frank I. Sheets 
at the Dedication <>l the new Research and Development Laboratories pictured on front cover — 



\M 



l\!\ I !! .RE to dedicate our dreams oi a i< \\ short 

|im« model n research and 

"i lit .i ting more than 

gs am ment; dedi- 

telligence and the pro- 

m who will work here — 

I knowledge, for the improvement oi 

in the public interesl and 

rial, non- 
ion to in Ktend 
ment and Established with 
i iation is 
\* !n« h make 
i Hi shipmi 
j i aphi< all) 
ilants, w hi< h produi e about nine- 
the portland c emei the Unit and 
(l.i. 

: ■ iarts : 

'<'• '•) (Ik field of portland cement 

development oi ne« .mm] improved cement u 
producti .mhI met nods | 

promotion, educational arorli and technical terviee t«» 
extend the usei oi portland cement and i<» improve 

Concrete ijuiil i 1 v t arid 



accident prevention work to encourage safety in the 
plant b of its member companies. 

"To carry out this program, the Association maintains ;i 
general headquarters staff of more than 180 scientists, engi- 
neers, architects and writers, and a held organization oi more 
than 300 engineers, architects and farm specialists working 

OUt oi 26 district offices to serve (ement users. 

"General headquarters coordinates and gives direction 
i" the program and develops the required scientific and tet li- 
nn al information. The held organization uses this material 
in diret t contacts with the public. 

"The Association has nothing whatever to do with the 
manufacture, distribution, pricing or selling of portland ce- 
ment, li dots not collect, distribute or publish statistics on 
produ< tive i apa< ity, production, costs or prices for portland 
cement. It does not speak (or the cement industry on com- 
men ial matters, and it has nothing to do with trade pra< tices. 

"Through its At (idem Prevention Bureau, the Associa- 
tion gives leadership to the safer) program oi its membei 
companies, in the last quarter century this safet) work has 
been instrumental in reducing the number oi accidents in 
member company plants b> approximately 83 per cent, until 
toda\ the < ement industry is one oi the safest oi all heaw in- 
dustries. The Portland Cement Association safet) trophy, 
awarded annuall) since 1 924 to cement mills operating with- 
out lost-time accidents, has been proudl) won \>\ 149 pi. mis 
operating a total oi 790 a< t ident-free 









Prominent engineers and architects, 
scientists, businessmen and public offi- 
cials from all over the United States 
and Canada participated in the dedi- 
cation of the Association's new Research 
and Development Laboratories, located 
about 1 6 miles northwest of Chicago. 




Uedicated to rroj 



I v S S • • • • • 



building a hotter At 



the Portland Cement Association has carried on an intensive proornm ol research and 
development on an ever-expanding hasis since it established its lirst research laboratories in 
1916. And to shorten the lag between the research laboratory findings and the actual 
field application or improved techniques in the uses ol cement and concrete, it has broadened its 
technical service, educational activities and engineering Held work to benelit all cement users. 




Thirty specialized laboratories for research and development in portland cement and 
concrete are housed in the Association's new laboratory buildings which contain a total 
of 98,000 sq.ft. (more than two acres) of floor space. 



The Association's new $3,000,000 laboratories near Chicago 
provide enlarged facilities for the research and development 
phases of its manifold program. This work has contributed much 
to cement and concrete technology and to progress in the con- 
struction field. The laboratories are the largest and most com- 
pletely equipped in the world devoted exclusively to research 
on cement and concrete. The highly trained engineers, chemists 



and research specialists who staff them are carefully selected 
from all over the country for their technical competence and 
engineering skills. 

These laboratories exemplify the sincere desire of the 67 
member companies of the Association (listed on page 22) to 
make possible the best and most economical use of portland 
cement and concrete, and to be of increasing public service. 



Research and Development 



Chemically, portland cement is a combination ol lime, 
silica, alumina, iron oxide ana small amounts ol other 
ingredients, including gypsum added in the final 
grinding process to regulate the setting time ol the cement. 

Physically, it is the result of processing literally mountains of 
limestone, clay, marl, sand, iron ore, cement rock, slag and 
other raw materials into a clinker, formed in huge cylin- 
drical steel rotary kilns where a chemical reaction between 
the raw materials takes place at a heat of approximately 2700 
deg. F, To produce finished portland cement, this clinker is 
then ground into a powder so fine it will pass through a sieve 
capable of holding water. 

Both chemically and physically, portland cement is one of 
the most complex ... as well as the most widely used ... of all 
modern engineering materials. For these reasons. Association 
studies in both laboratory and field require the most refined 
and advanced procedures of modern science. 



The sieve this young lady holds 
in her right hand has 40,000 
openings to the square inch, yet 
portland cement is so carefully 
made and finely ground that 
more than 90 per cent of it will 
pass through. An identical sieve 
in her left hand is holding water. 




Concrete is a mixture of sand and gravel or other inert materials bound together 
by a hardened paste made of portland cement and water. The durability and 
strength of the concrete depend largely on the quality of the portland cement- 
water paste. If the paste is diluted with too much water, the concrete will lack 
durability and will not be strong. Because the cement-water paste is so vitally 
important to the quality of concrete, scientists are constantly studying the com- 
plex internal, chemical and physical properties of the paste. 



The variety of work in the laboratories 
is as diverse as are the uses of portland 
cement and concrete. The nature of the 
work in the laboratories is as complex as 
portland cement itself. Apparatus deli- 
cate enough to weigh or measure dust 
from a butterfly's wings and huge ma- 




SECOND FLOOR PLAN 
MAIN BUILDING 



chines powerful enough to crush a pav- 
ing slab or twist a girder are required. 
A better conception of the many 
laboratory facilities needed for cement 
and concrete research can be gained 
by inspection of the floor plans repro- 
duced here. 




Storage 6- 

Processing 



Industrial 
Lab 



Meter 



Cement &■ 
Materials 
Storage 






FLOOR PLAN 
AUXILIARY BUILDING 



BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN 
MAIN BUILDING 




In specially constructed rooms in the laboratories, concrete specimens 
in a few short weeks are subjected to a punishing yearly weather 
cycle of freezing and thawing and wetting and drying. 




A 2-ft. high concrete specimen — 12 in. in diameter — was photographed at 
the split second of its "explosion" after withstanding a compressive force of 
873,000 lb., a load equivalent to the weight of several large railway loco- 
motives. Tests like this provide information which helps engineers design safe, 
economical concrete structural members to carry enormous loads. 



Because concrete structures must serve under 
widely differing conditions or climate and use. 
trie Association stari is constantly carrying on 
observation 01 concrete in trie Held under severe 
conditions of weather and wear. 

To supplement, interpret and expand actual field observa- 
tion studies, these same conditions are simulated in the 
Association's new laboratories by means of controlled tem- 
perature and humidity rooms and testing machines of 
various types. 

For example, in durability tests, specimens are sub- 
jected to moist heat, dry heat and severe cold; to alternate 
cycles of freezing and thawing, such as occur in areas where 
arctic temperatures are encountered ; and cycles of heating 
and drying, cooling and soaking, such as occur when rain 
falls on pavements or other structures that have been ex- 
posed to a broiling summer sun. In strength tests, machines 
rapidly determine the ability of the specimens to with- 
stand the racking, bending, pulling and crushing forces to 
which concrete is often subjected. 

Continuing studies relating to proportioning of ma- 
terials, placing and curing of concrete, along with dura- 
bility and strength tests are of vital importance in deter- 
mining the performance of concrete under different condi- 



tions of exposure and loading; but of equal importance are 
the highly scientific investigations into the complex chem- 
ical and physical structure of cement paste and hardened 
concrete — investigations which are essential in expanding 
even further the many uses of portland cement and concrete. 
These studies are precise and continuous, and are 
carried out in chemistry and physics laboratories especially 
equipped for such work. Chemical analyses are made not 
only of the portland cements used in making concrete test 
specimens, but of the raw materials used in the production 
of the cements, and the aggregates and other materials used 
with them to make concrete. Meticulous tests, measure- 
ments and studies are also made of cement paste . . . the 
mixture of portland cement and water which, as it hardens, 
binds together sand and gravel, crushed stone or other 
materials, into concrete. These studies are vital, for the 
quality, performance, and most of the characteristics of 
concrete are directly dependent upon the materials which 
enter into its making and upon the characteristics and per- 
formance of the cement-water paste. 



Thousands of microscopic measurements — as small as a ten-thousandth of 
an inch — are made at Association laboratories to determine the physical 
properties of concrete specimens subjected to severe weather tests. 



This PCA scientist is studying 
factors which influence the 
watertightness of concrete 
which is vital in water and 
sewerage pipe lines, reser- 
voirs, swimming pools, founda- 
tions, basements, and scores 
of other similar uses. 



Almost every climate in the 
world can be duplicated in the 
laboratories' controlled tem- 
perature and humidity rooms, 
and concrete test specimens 
are subjected to every con- 
ceivable type of punishment 
from exposure. Information 
gained from these tests is 
quickly made public so that 
users everywhere can enjoy 
maximum service from concrete. 



*-d 




/U3 

1 i 


n 


LCijffi 


• 


^■Wlfll 




By listening to concrete speci- 
mens "sing" on this high fre- 
quency sonic testing machine, 
laboratory scientists gain im- 
portant information on the de- 
sign of concrete to give maxi- 
mum service for highways and 
countless other structures. 



I j *\ 






This heavy-duty laboratory saw is cutting specimens from 
a section of concrete pavement which has been in use 
for years. These specimens will be subjected to microscop- 
ic and other scientific studies as part of a comprehensive 
analysis of the internal structure of concrete in service. 



Soil-cement pavement has 
lifted many a farmer out of 
the mud by making possible 
low-cost, light-traffic roads 
utilizing road-site soil. Here 
technicians study cores cut 
from soil-cement pavements. 



A freshly molded concrete 
block is placed in a steam 
chamber to be cured under 
controlled conditions. Results 
of this and similar investiga- 
tions are made available to 
the more than 5,000 concrete 
masonry manufacturers in the 
United Slates and Canada. 



10- 



A prestressed concrete 
beam undergoes test in the 
mil lion- pound compression 
testing machine. Prestress- 
fng, a method of making 
concrete even stronger by 
placing high tension or 
"pull" on the steel reinforce- 
ment embedded in the 
concrete, is a major PCA 
development project. 



Association work in laboratory ana 1 liel cl has resulted 
in substantial savings througk greater durability 
and longer service life for concrete structures. 

The overall result of this work has been to improve the 
firesafety, health and sanitation of communities in the 
United States and Canada, and to create even better, safer 
and more economical facilities for highway, rail, water and 
air transportation. 

A few of the principal development projects of the 
Association have included: sound engineering design for 
concrete pavements, which has helped in the development 



This expressway was built with air-en- 
trained concrete, developed through 
research to produce pavements highly 
resistant to severe frost action and 
surface scaling caused by chemicals 
used to remove ice and snow. 






1^ 



PCA scientists and engineers working in 
the laboratory and the field have devel- 
oped much of the technical data necessary 
for the construction of finer, longer-lasting 
concrete highways . . . airport pavements 
to carry today's tremendous plane loads 
. . . more beautiful and more economical 
concrete masonry homes, architectural con- 
crete buildings and flresafe farm struc- 
tures . . . bridges of great strength and 
beauty . . . soil-cement for low-cost, light 
traffic pavements and a variety of other 
uses . . . and huge dams for water supply, 
irrigation, and flood control. 





of America's network of concrete highways; soil-cement for 
low-cost, light-traffic roads, streets and airports and for 
other uses; pressure grouting to stabilize railway and high- 
way subgrades, fills and tunnels, and reduce track main- 
tenance expense; new methods of concrete house building; 
new methods of making colored concrete, and special pre- 
cast concrete products. 

The Association had an important part in the develop- 
ment of air-entrained concrete that is highly resistant to 



severe frost action, and to scaling where salts are used for 
ice and snow removal from pavements. Laboratory studies 
and analyses of the indeterminate stresses developed in re- 
inforced concrete structures, and of the acoustical properties 
and heat insulation values of concrete have helped archi- 
tects and engineers to design and build more economically 
the soaring skyscrapers and bridges, modern factories and 
firesafe schools, hospitals, apartment buildings and homes 
that today we take for granted. 




Concrete has lon£ been recognized as a 
structural material, nut in the last few years 
it has emerged as an important architectural 
material as well. 

In the construction of its new laboratories it was onl\ 
natural that the Association should practice what it 
has preached. The exterior walls of the two buildings 
are of architectural concrete, the frames and floors of 
reinforced concrete. The interior walls are of con- 
'• masonry. Cast stone was used in portions of the 
lobby and rest rooms. 

ce concrete is plastic when placed, it is pos- 
sible to cast ornamentation of the same materia] as 
the structural portions of a building — and at the 
same time. Full advantage was taken of this impor- 
tant property oi concrete in building the new labo- 
ratories, as seen by the pictures opposite 




Ornamental concrete panels are set into the underside of roof decks (right). Molds 
for casting these panels were reused many times to carry out a motif, making this 
repetition of detail in concrete speedy and inexpensive. The reeded piers (above) 
were made with the same concrete used for the board-grained textured walls. The 
difference in appearance was obtained by using different types of forms. Most of 
the interior walls are concrete masonry decorated with portland cement base paints. 
The open texture of the masonry is pleasing in appearance, as may be seen in the 
auditorium wall at left below, and is sound-absorbent, producing excellent acoustical 
properties. Highly polished cast stone was used to face the lower walls and stairs 
of the lobby (below right). The floors are terrazzo. 






13 




In one phase of the Association's "Long-Time Study", 
the effect of exposure on some 2,000 concrete slabs, 
posts and boxes is being observed at two test plots 
located in the widely varying climates of the Midwesl 
and the South. Another project is the observation of 
concrete structural members driven into both sea water 
and fresh water in four widely separated locations 
having different exposure conditions. 



The complete confidence of Asso- 
ciation members in the future of 
Portland cement and concrete is 
evidenced by their sponsorship of 
the "Long-Time Study of Cement 
Performance in Concrete", de- 
scribed on this page. The public 
benefits of this investigation will 
far outlive the men who con- 
ceived it. Samples of materials 
used In the "Long-Time Study" 
specimens are preserved in more 
than 24,000 hermetically sealed 
containers for study by scientists 
25, 50 and 100 or more years 
from now. 



The new laboratories are the "headquarters' ior that phase 

ol the Association s work dealing with research and development. 

But they by no means constitute the only facilities for such work. 




In addition, the PCA maintains a staff of re- 
search scientists at the National Bureau of 
Standards in Washington, D. C, working 
under a cooperative fellowship set up to study 
basic problems relating to the constitution 
and properties of portland cement. The 
Association actively participates in several of 
the more than 265 different research projects 
involving cement and concrete being carried 
on by engineering colleges and private, federal 
and state agencies; and in numerous field ex- 
posure laboratories widely dispersed through- 
out the United States the Association carries 
on its Long-Time Study of Cement Perform- 
ance in Concrete. 

The Long-Time Study, started in 1940, 
is planned to continue indefinitely. While it 
is financed by the Association, the program 



14' 



was developed by an advisory committee of 
twelve members. Eight of these were promi- 
nent research engineers and scientists asso- 
ciated with some of the largest technical and 
construction agencies in the United States 
and Canada, and four were research scien- 
tists of the Portland Cement Association. 

The scope of this research is nationwide. 
It includes such contrasting locations as New 
England and Florida, the High Sierras of 
California and the hills of South Carolina. 

Largest of the held research projects are 
three test highways totaling more than six 
miles of two-lane concrete pavement, located 
in widely varying climatic areas of the United 
States. Other long-time studies are being con- 
ducted on thousands of concrete structural 
members exposed to sea water and fresh water 



and to a variety of weather conditions. Still 
another phase of the long-time study is the 
observation of some 2000 < oncrete slabs, 
posts and boxes placed in test plots — one in 
( ieorgia and the other in Illinois. 

Hermetically sealed samples of the port- 
land cements and aggregates used in these 
investigations are stored at the Ass< 
new laboratories, so that scientists 25, 50, 100 
or more years from now will be able t< 
amine the spe< i(i< < ement and aggregate used 
in spet miens in< oi poi aled in this stiuh . 

Observation of the more than 10,000 
U\st specimens or iginalk inc hided in the study 
lias alrcad\ provided much valuable infor- 
mation on the i\ pes of concrete mixtures 
suited i< i the ( limates ,hkI < onditioi 
ice in w hit h the Npn iinruv , M ,■ located < 
tinning observation is expected (o [>rovide 
information that will result in even highei 
quality, longer lasting, moreeconom 
land cement concrete. 



This huge million-pound compression testing machine can 
crush a pavement slab, yet is calibrated so delicately 
that it can measure the pressure needed to shatter a 
watch crystal. The machine is needed in studies of the 
strength of concrete columns, beams and slabs, and will 
accommodate specimens up to 30 ft. in lenglh, 10 ft. in 
width and 1 5 ft. in height. 



x 



15 








v 



\ 




4»iiiiiii 



The Association's all-concrete 
headquarters building located 
at 33 W. Grand Avenue in 
Chicago is the nerve center of 
the organization's manifold 
activities, serving cement users 
in the United States and Can- 
ada for more than a third of 
a century. 



Education. Technical S 



ervice an 



d Promotion work 



II is a policy ol the Portland ( !ement Association to 
main- all scientific discoveries and new developments. 
including patentable inventions, relating to cement and 
concrete uses, fully and freely available to the public 

in the shortest possible time. 

To do this, the Asa < Iation mainum- at its general head- 
quami. building in Chicago a staff of engineering specially 
writers who coordinate and translate into easily under- 
standable form specialized and oftentimes highly technical 



information. This information is then made available to 
cement users through the Association's field engineers, through 
short courses, demonstrations and lectures conducted by staff 
memheiv and through motion picture films, slides, advertis- 

i nd a wide range of te< hni< aJ and non-technical literature. 

Through this widespread educational program, the PC 'A 
has become generally recognized as headquarters for technical 
service in its field, and as a clearing house for reliable, up-to- 
the-minute information on portland cement, the makin 
design procedures and construction meth* 



16 



Two and one-half million pieces of literature are distributed by 
the Association in an average year. More than 400 different 
publications have been prepared to service the hundreds of thou- 
sands of requests for information which the Association receives 
annually from cement users in the United States and Canada. 



Each year the general and district offices of the Portland 
Cement Association receive approximately 300,' K)0 requests 
for information. These requests come from all over the United 
States and Canada, by personal calls, telephone, telegraph 
and mail. Each request is given prompt attention by a com- 
petent stafT member . . . whether it be from an engineer, 
architect or contractor working on a metropolitan skyscraper, 
or a distant farmer who wants to build a com rete barn Boor 
or feeding lot. 

To service the great bulk of these requests quickly and 
adequately, the Association has prepared more than 400 dif- 
ferent publications covering the various fields in which < ement 
and concrete are used. The publications range from highly 
technical booklets on the design of reinforced concrete to 
simple, easily understood folders on how to build a concrete 
septic tank or make small improvements around the home. 
More than 2,500,000 pieces of literature are distributed by the 
Association in an average year. 

To gather, appraise and put into usable form the vast 
amount of specialized information that is needed to answer 
requests, the Association maintains six separate technical and 
promotion bureaus. These bureaus include: 

HIGHWAYS AND MUNICIPAL: The Association cooper- 

ates closely with engineers, contractors and public officials in 




the planning, designing and building of concrete pavements 
[ui roads, streets, alleys, aii irking facilities md othei 

uscv Fechnical reports and manuals and 'Ik- t on< ui m 
Highways ind Publk Improvements magazine I nip I 
engineers and officials informed on 'Ik latest developments 
in the use of a mi i etc f >. i v ement , 

STRUCTURAL AND RAILWAYS: Hie design and < instruc- 
tion of large reinforced concrete structures, m<l the man) 
railroad uses oi portland cement and con< rete call fo 
amount of technical data .i> well as engineering skill, 
iation, through it> edui ational work, its ta I mi' al sei 
and three of its magazines R ( (Reinforced Concreti , 
( :< »\< ki 1 1 < i < >k R \u u w s, and Ai<< mm I' R \i ( ' <\< R] i E 
furnishes up-to-date information on progress in these fields. 

CONSERVATION: Concrete is widely used in the construc- 
tion of dams, reservoirs, levees, Hood walls and spillways, f< r 



17 



irrigation and drainage canals, and for water supply, sanita- 
tion and sewage facilities. It plays an important role in the 
restoration, preservation and development of our soil and 
natural resources, and in the control and supply of water. 
Through its Conservation Bureau and its district offices, the 
Association provides technical service and information on the 
uses of portland cement and concrete in this broad field. 

HOUSING AND CEMENT PRODUCTS: Concrete, in ad- 
dition to being one of the principal wall materials used in the 
construction of houses, is used almost exclusively for basement 
walls, foundation walls and footings, and for a variety of other 
purposes in home building. In one recent year, for example, 
concrete was used in the construction of 123,700,000 sq.ft. 
of house floors alone. The Association furnishes information 
on the use of concrete in house and small building construc- 
tion, and on the wide and growing range of concrete products. 



FARM: The uses of concrete on the farm are almost as varied 
as the duties of the farmer himself. Only a partial listing 
would include its use in the construction of barns, milk houses, 
feed storage bins, feeding lots and barnyard pavements, silos, 
tractor and tool sheds, farrowing and poultry houses, water 
supply and fire-fighting facilities, sewage and sanitation works, 
soil erosion control, and a multitude of home improvements. 

SOIL-CEMENT: The Portland Cement Association won the 
American Trade Association Executives Award for outstand- 
ing public service in developing soil-cement pavements. An 
educational program coupled with continuing research has 
expanded the uses of this relatively new construction material. 
It has resulted in the building of more than 72,000,000 sq. yd. 
of low-first-cost soil-cement paving in the continental United 
States for light traffic roads, streets and airports, and for ditch 
and canal linings, embankment slopes and similar projects. 




Association publications range from simple non- 
technical folders on how to mix concrete by hand 
and make small improvements around the home, 
to highly technical design and construction book- 
lets for use by engineers, architects and con- 
tractors. 



18> 



Each year hundreds of Thousands of people view Associa- 
tion educational motion pictures, film strips, slides and other 
visual aids prepared to help them gain Increasing value from 
the use of portland cement and concrete. 



Spearheading the Association i educational 
program is a I ■ * - 1 « I stall ol more than .'{tut sLillrd 
engineers) architects and Farm specialists) working 
out ol general headduarters and *2<» district officei 
to serve eement users in *5 states, the District 
ol ( olumhia and British ( olumhia. 

i i men are backed by the Association's staff ii I 
which furnishes them with tet finical information, and keeps 
them abreast of current progress in .ill set tions oi tht 
try. rhus the fieldmen are able to rendei i xperl t< 
sen it c to engineers, contrat tors, art hue* ts, puU ■ 
and other users oi cement, and to help them with theii 
cement, concrete, design and construt tion probli 

\( no time dot's the Assot iation's stafl furnish engim 
inn or architectural plans, or in an) way assume the func- 
tions of the engineei t n architect, 

As .1 part of n^ educational program, tht V- 
stafl gives hundreds of lectures and demonstration 

construction superintendents and workers, farmers 
and others to help them net maximum sen it c in m 
It also provides educational information for engine 
and architectural colleges, vocational si hu<>K. farm 01 




In a recent year, more than 50,000 a< ^ineers, cc 

intendents, farmer*, students and many oth»- i in getting 

■ from portland cement and CC nded edu* 

and demonstrations conducted by Association staff memt 





Association service to cement 
users is comprehensive. It 
reaches from the office of the 
architect and designer in a 
metropolitan center to the con- 
struction superintendent on the 
job — and to farm leaders 
sponsoring concrete construc- 
tion demonstrations in far- 
distant rural communities. 




zations, technical groups and construction agencies, and 
assists with instruction on improved methods of concrete 
design and construction. 

Another important phase of the educational program 
includes the Association's "short courses". In one year more 
than 50,000 engineers, architects, contractors, producers of 
ready-mixed concrete, concrete products manufacturers 
and others attended these courses to study how best to use 
Portland cement, make quality concrete and soil-cement, 
and design and build concrete pavements and structures. 

The Association makes wide use of visual aids in its 
educational program. It has a number of film strips and 
motion pictures, most of the latter in sound and color, to 
portray graphically the manufacture of portland cement, 
and its use in many fields. These films are in constant 
demand by engineering and technical organizations, and 
by industrial, agricultural, business, social and educational 
groups. 

The PCA general headquarters staff (including the 
research and development division) and its widespread field 
organization work as a team to help users get ever greater 
and lower cost service from portland cement and concrete 
construction. 



By familiarizing designers, public officials and builders with 
the newest construction methods, Association staff members 
help them to effect economies and provide even better serv- 
ice to the public. However, the Association does not furnish 
engineering or architectural plans, because such plans re- 
quire the services of local engineers and architects. 



20< 



Saiety Work 



In the last 25 years, member companies oi the 
Association have reduced the Irecfuency ol accidents 
in their plants by approximately 83 per cent... 
one 01 the most remarkable and grainy ing records 
ever established in any heavy industry. 

This record is particularly significant because the manufac- 
ture of portland cement involves the hazardous operations of 
quarrying, mining and blasting, the use of high voltage elec- 
tric current, intense heat and some of the world's largest 
moving machinery. 

This enviable position is the result of carefully planned 
and executed safety programs in the plants of member com- 
panies of the Association. In these programs, work methods 
and equipment are periodically studied for hazards to health 
and safety, and corrective measures are instituted and mechan- 
ical safeguards provided where needed. Persistent program s 
of safety education are carried on. 

The PCA, through its Accident Prevention Bureau, co- 
ordinates and gives leadership and educational assistance to 
these programs. It maintains an accident-reporting system, 
and prepares and distributes to member companies a variety 
of publications, posters, bulletins, letters, and other safety aids. 
It also holds a series of regional safety meetings for company 
and plant leaders in strategically located cities throughout 
the country. In these sessions, safety practices are examined. 



The Portland Cement Associa- 
tion's Safety Trophy is award- 
ed or reawarded annually to 
those member company ce- 
ment mills operating a full 
calendar year without a lost- 
time accident. It has been won 
by "1 49 plants, operating a 
total of 790 accident-free 
years ... a safety record be- 
lieved to be unparalleled by 
any other industry. 




safety organizations and programs are appraised, and safety 
leadership problems discussed. 

To encourage these safety programs, the Association 
annually awards or reawards its safety trophy to mills in 
which workers operate the full calendar year without a lost- 
time accident. It also maintains a unique Thousand-Day Club 
composed of plants credited with more than 1,000 successive 
safe days of operation. 



A portland cement 
mill, one of more than 
1 50 such plants in the 
United States and 
Canada. 



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21- 



Portland Cement Association MEMBER COMPANIES . . . 



AETNA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

P.O. Box 392, Bay City, Mich. 
ALABAMA DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 

256 N. Joachim, Mobile, Ala. 
ALLENTOWN PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Fuller Bldg., Catasauqua, Po. 

ALPHA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
1 5 S. Third St., Easton, Pa. 

ARIZONA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
Rillito, Ariz. 

ARKANSAS DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 
61 1 Wallace Bldg., Little Rock, Ark. 

ASH GROVE LIME & PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
101 W. 11th St., Kansas City 6, Mo. 

BESSEMER LIMESTONE & CEMENT CO. 
1 100 Wick Bldg., Youngslown 3, Ohio 

BRITISH COLUMBIA CEMENT CO., LTD. 
500 Fort St., Victoria, B.C. Canada 

CALIFORNIA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

General Petroleum Bldg., Los Angeles 17, Calif. 

CANADA CEMENT COMPANY, LTD. 

P.O. Box 290, Station B, Montreal, Que., Canodc 

COLORADO DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 

Denver National Bldg., Denver 2, Colo. 
CONSOLIDATED CEMENT CORP. 
1 1 1 W. Monroe St., Chicago 3, III. 
KANSAS DIVISION 

618'/! Madison St., Fredonia, Kan. 
MICHIGAN DIVISION 

1003 National Bank Bldg., Jackson, Mich. 

COPLAY CEMENT MANUFACTURING CO. 
Coplay, Po. 

CUMBERLAND PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Chattanooga Bank Bldg., Chattanooga 2, Tenn. 

DEWEY PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

424 Alameda Road, Kansas City 2, Mo. 



DIAMOND PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Middle Branch, Ohio 
FEDERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO., INC. 

P.O. Box 115, Buffalo 5, N.Y. 
GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
1 1 1 W. Monroe St., Chicago 3, III. 
FLORIDA DIVISION 

305 Morgan St., Tempo 2, Fla. 
SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

531 Volunteer Bldg., Chattanooga 2, Tenn. 
TRINITY DIVISION 

1618 Republic Bank Bldg., Dallas 1, Texas 

GLENS FALLS PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Glens Falls, N.Y. 
GREEN BAG CEMENT DIVISION, PITTSBURGH COKE 
AND CHEMICAL CO. 

P.O. Box 1645, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

GULF DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 

P.O. Box 3046, Houston 1, Texas 
HAWKEYE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

802 Hubbell Bldg., Des Moines 9, Iowa 
HERCULES CEMENT CORP. 

1420 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Po. 
HERMITAGE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

American Trust Bldg., Nashville 3, Tenn. 
HURON PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Ford Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 
KEYSTONE PORTLAND CEMENT CO, 

1400 S. Penn Square, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 
KOSMOS PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Storks Bldg., Louisville 2, Ky. 
LAWRENCE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

1 50 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Young Bldg., Allentown, Pa. 

LONE STAR CEMENT CORP. 

1 00 Pork Ave., New York 1 7, N.Y. 



LONGHORN PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
1200 Transit Tower, San Antonio 5, Texas 

LOUISVILLE CEMENT CO. 

315 Guthrie St.. Louisville 2, Ky. 

MANITOWOC PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 

MARQUETTE CEMENT MANUFACTURING CO. 
20 N. Wocker Drive, Chicago 6, III. 

MEDUSA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

1000 Midland Bldg., Cleveland 15, Ohio 
MISSOURI PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

3615 Olive St., St. Louis 8, Mo. 
MONARCH CEMENT CO. 

Humboldt, Kan. 

MONOLITH PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

215 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
MONOLITH PORTLAND MIDWEST CO. 

215 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
NATIONAL CEMENT CO. 

2308 Fourth Ave., N., Birmingham 3, Ala. 

NATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

1434 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia 10, Po. 

NAZARETH CEMENT CO. 

Nazareth, Po. 
NEBRASKA DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 

680 Insurance Bldg., Omoho 2, Neb. 

NORTH AMERICAN CEMENT CORP. 
41 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. 

NORTHWESTERN PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
Northern Life Tower, Seattle 1, Wash. 

NORTHWESTERN STATES PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
Mason City, Iowa 

OKLAHOMA DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 
1018 Perrine Bldg., Oklahoma City 2, Okla. 

OLYMPIC PORTLAND CEMENT CO. LTD. 

1425 Dexter-Horton Bldg., Seattle 4, Wash. 



PEERLESS CEMENT CORP. 

1 144 Free Press Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 
PENNSYLVANIA-DIXIE CEMENT CORP. 

60 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. 
PETOSKEY PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Petoskey, Mich. 
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO., COLUMBIA CEMENT 
DIVISION 

Zanesville, Ohio 
RIVERSIDE CEMENT CO. 

621 S. Hope St Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
SAN ANTONIO PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

P.O. Box 41 58, Station A, San Antonio 7, Texas 
ST. MARY'S CEMENT CO. LTD. 

357 Bay St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 
SOUTHWESTERN PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

1034 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
SPOKANE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

724 Old Notional Bank Bldg., Spokane 8, Wash. 
STANDARD LIME & STONE CO. 

2000 First Nationol Bank Bldg., Baltimore 3, Md. 
STANDARD PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION, DIAMOND 
ALKALI CO. 

8 1 Union Commerce Bldg., Cleveland 1 4, Ohio 
SUPERIOR CEMENT DIVISION, NEW YORK COAL 
SALES CO. 

150 E. Broad St., Columbus 1 5, Ohio 
SUPERIOR PORTLAND CEMENT, INC. 

1003 Seaboard Bldg., Seattle 1, Wash. 
UNION PORTLAND DIVISION, IDEAL CEMENT CO. 

554 S. Third West, Salt Lake City, Utah 
UNIVERSAL ATLAS CEMENT CO. 

1 35 East 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. 
VALLEY FORGE CEMENT CO. 

Fuller Bldg., Catasauqua, Pa. 
VOLUNTEER PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

P.O. Box 1 190, Knoxville, Tenn. 
WHITEHALL CEMENT MANUFACTURING CO. 

123 S. Brood St., Philadelphia 9, Pa. 



Portland Cement Association OFFICEk 



HEADQUARTERS ORGANIZATION: General Office and Research Laboratories, 33 W.Grand Avenue, Chicago 10, Illinois 

DISTRICT OFFICES 



ATLANTA 3, GA. 
Hurt Bldg. 



AUSTIN 1, TEXAS 
1 14 East 8th St. 



CHICAGO 10, ILL 
33 W. Grand Ave. 



COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 
50 W. Broad St. 



BIRMINGHAM 3, ALA. DENVER 2, COLO. 
504 Watts Bldg. 521 Boston Bldg. 



INDIANAPOLIS 4, IND. 
61 1 Merchants Bank Bldg. 

KANSAS CITY 6, MO. 
1627 Dierks Bldg. 

LANSING 8, MICH. 
Olds Tower Bldg. 



MEMPHIS 3, TENN. 
916 Falls Bldg. 



MILWAUKEE 2, WIS. 
735 N. Water St. 



BOSTON 16, MASS. 
20 Providence St. 



DES MOINES 9, IOWA LOS ANGELES 17, CALIF. 
408 Hubbell Bldg. 8 1 6 W. Fifth St. 



OKLAHOMA CITY 2, OKLA. 
1308 First National Bldg. 

OMAHA 2, NEB. 
504 S. 18th St. 



SALT LAKE CITY 1, UTAH VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA 



MINNEAPOLIS 2, MINN. PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 

920 Northwestern Bank Bldg. 1528 Walnut St. 



NEW YORK 17, NY. 
347 Madison Ave. 



RICHMOND 19, VA. 

1210 State Planters Bank Bldg. 



David Keith Bldg. 

SEATTLE 1, WASH. 
903 Seaboard Bldg. 

SPOKANE 8, WASH. 
Old National Bank Bldg. 

ST. LOUIS 1, MO. 

913 Syndicate Trust Bldg. 



318 Shelly Bldg. 

WASHINGTON 4, D.C. 
837 National Press Bldg. 



LOCATION of Memoer Company Mills and PCA Offices . 




# Location of PCA member company mills 

® Location of PCA district offices 

if Location of PCA general offices and laboratories 

XXXXXX PCA district boundaries 



7> 



CJn CJxecoaniTion . , . 



I hrough the years the Portland Cement 
Association has been privileged to cooperate with 
many engineering colleges, technical and scientilic 
organizations and public and private agencies which 
have contributed much to the technology ol 
portland cement and concrete. 

To these engineers, architects, educators, 
contractors, government design and construction 
agencies, inventors, home builders, farmers, 
transportation agencies, public health services and 
many others, the Association expresses its sincere 
appreciation and warm thanks lor the line work they 
have done — and lor the opportunity 01 cooperating 
with them in the building of a better America. 



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E101 25M 11-50